Beginner Kettlebell Exercise For Women: Part 3 - Kettlebell Squat Press

Beginner Kettlebell Exercise For Women: Part 3 - Kettlebell Squat Press

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on 2nd May 2018

The Kettlebell Squat Press

Part 3 in our series based on beginning kettlebell movements for women is about the Kettlebell Squat Press. After this post, we will put all the movements we have gone over into a workout you can do involving all three. After mastering the Kettlebell Deadlift and the Kettlebell Swing you can move on to this latest movement. The reason it is important to first master the Kettlebell Deadlift is because some of the movements and muscles engaged are essential for performing a proper kettlebell swing and the kettlebell squat. So make sure you have that down first.

Brittany van Schravendijk, will be walking us through video tutorials of the three movements we are highlighting in this series, including this one and then helping us put them all together for a workout at the end. Brittany is a Master of Sport, World Record Holder, and National Record Holder in Kettlebell Sport. Brittany is the Head Coach of Kettlebell Sport at KOR Strength and Conditioning in San Diego, California. She has traveled all over the world to teach Kettlebell Sport workshops. Brittany is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA.

The video below will walk you through the correct way to execute The Kettlebell Squat Press, but here are some key points.

Why The Kettlebell Squat Press?

The Kettlebell Squat Press is a fantastic total body exercise because of all the different elements of your body you engage to perform correctly. It will involve your lower body, engaging your core and pressing at the top of the movement. Because of how the kettlebells fit on your body your momentum will be forward and this is where having great body control and core strength will have to stabilize your body. If you don't have this already, this movement will help you develop it. Additionally, you should be able to squat deeper than with a barbell because of the positioning of the bells. The results of this exercise will be a stronger midsection, a stronger and defined figure as well as more overall strength.

If you like what you see, we do have a weekly workout list you can sign up for which incorporates the movements we will be going over into cardio and strength training sessions.

The Kettlebell Squat Press:

  • Combines lower body work, upper body press with core activation
    • use core to stabilize bell overhead
  • Start by bringing the bell into the rack position (shown in video below)
  • Feet are hip width apart, weight is on heels, sink with hips level with knees or slightly lower
  • MAKE SURE to keep your elbow up and chest high to keep the core engage -- drive your body up with the heels back to standing position then press the bell overhead
  • Return to rack position and then begin your squat again
  • inhale as you come down and exhale as you go up

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The Kettlebell Squat Press

Read below for The Two Bell Squat Press


We publish workouts each week you can utilize the movements you learn!

Two Kettlebell Squat Press:

  • Designed for more complexity and heart rate training, still engages core
  • Clean both bells to rack position,
    • feet are hip width apart, weight is on heels, sink with hips level with knees or slightly lower
  • MAKE SURE to keep your elbow up and chest high to keep the core engage -- drive your body up with the heels back to standing position then press the bell overhead
  • Press both bells at the top before returning to rack position and beginning squat again

Which kettlebell weights to use: 

(This explanation was also in Part 1, you can reread or skip if you have already)

Even with specific kettlebell lifts, you can do them with different weights depending on your goals. For example, for high repetition training in which the goal is to get your heart rate up, use weight that you can complete at least 20-30 repetitions with perfect form.

For building strength, use a weight that challenges you for the required number of repetitions. Your form should stay consistent, but the last 1-2 repetitions should be pushing your limits. So for example, if your goal is 10 reps, then 8-10 should be challenging for you.

If you are brand new to kettlebell training, use a weight that is almost to light for the first 4-8 weeks of a strength training program, especially if you have never lifted weights before. Your body needs to adapt to the load and learn the proper movement patterns before progressing to a heavier weight.

We have created a post specifically about training weight selection you can read HERE.

Which type of kettlebell should you use:

You can choose a kettlebell style based on the type of training you would like to do. If you are interested in training for a Kettlebell Sport competition, it doesn't really matter whether you use hardstyle kettlebells or Sport kettlebells. However, if building your strength endurance with longer sets of clean and jerk or snatch is something you are interested in doing (see Intro to Kettlebell Sport), consider using competition style kettlebells. Similarly, if comfort on the forearm and/or rack position is important to you, most people find the competition style kettlebells more friendly.

Stay tuned for Part 4 when we put all the movements from this series into a total workout!

What Is Next?

If this is your first time reading one of our posts, we create kettlebell workouts in collaboration with kettlebell experts designed to give you maximal results and not take up much of your time. We send these to your in box automatically every week! We recommend you read more about receiving a quick, free, dynamic kettlebell workout every week you can click below.

Also, we recommend you subscribe to our posts so you can be notified when we publish more in this series. Additionally, you can be notified when we publish new articles about specific kettlebell movements or techniques as well as niche pieces like this designed for specific training.

LIKE WHAT YOU HAVE READ SO FAR? SIGN UP TO BE NOTIFIED ABOUT THIS SERIES BY ENTERING YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS IN THE SIGN UP FORM ON IN THE RIGHT COLUMN.

We have created a post specifically about training weight selection you can read HERE.

Kettlebell Kings is running a great promotion in July, it is called our 'Swing a King for Free' promotion. When you purchase in July, you will be automatically entered into our drawing to win a kettlebell of your choosing in August! All purchases are automatically entered! Take a look around at Kettlebellkings.com for something you like!

About Brittany:

Brittany is a Master of Sport, World Record Holder, and National Record Holder in Kettlebell Sport. She learned how to lift kettlebells at one of the top Kettlebell Sport gyms in the United States, Ice Chamber, which has produced seven female Master of Sport lifters to date (Brittany is the most recent one).

Brittany is the Head Coach of Kettlebell Sport at KOR Strength and Conditioning in San Diego, California. She has traveled all over the world to teach Kettlebell Sport workshops. Brittany is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA.

You can find more information about Brittany on her website (www.kbfitbritt.com), which contains information, tips, videos, and tutorials on kettlebell lifting.

List of accomplishments:

  • Youngest American female Master of Sport
  • World Record Holder in 2x20kg and 2x16kg Long Cycle
  • National Record Holder in 24kg Biathlon
  • National Champion in 24kg Snatch
  • Master of Sport, 24kg Snatch
  • Master of Sport, 24kg Long Cycle
  • Silver medalist in 16kg Snatch at the IUKL World Championships, Junior category

 *Does not include 12-32 Kg Adjustable Competition Kettlebell